Michael Stull

Introduction to Agriculture

Introduction to Agriculture courses survey a wide array of topics within the agricultural industry, exposing students to the many and varied types of agriculture and livestock career opportunities and to those in related fields (such as natural resources). These courses serve to introduce students to the agricultural field, providing them an opportunity to identify an area for continued study or to determine that their interest lies elsewhere. They often focus on developing communication skills, business principles, and leadership skills.

Animal Science

1 Credit (elective) | Odd Years Only

Animal Production/Science courses impart information about the care and management of domestic and farm animals. These courses may cover animal nutrition, health, behavior, selection, reproduction, anatomy and physiology, facilities, product processing, and marketing. Students may study a particular species or they may learn how to care for and maintain livestock as a more inclusive study.

Natural Resource Management

.5 Credit (elective)

Natural Resource Management courses combine the fields of ecology and conservation with planning for the efficient use and preservation of land, water, wildlife, and forests. Within the general area of natural resources management, these courses usually cover specific topics and uses, such as hunting or fishing preserves, forest production and management, wildlife preservation, and human outdoor recreation.

Ag Food Science

.5 Credit (elective)

Food Product Processing courses impart the knowledge and skills needed to produce and manufacture food products for the consumer market. These courses focus on food products while covering a variety of topics, such as quality selection and preservation, equipment care and sanitation, government regulations, marketing, consumer trends, and product research and development.

Internship in Agriculture

1 Credit (elective)

Provides students to gain knowledge and skills for various Agriculture Careers. Students will provide a detailed log of experiences and hours while participating.

Advanced Introduction to Agriscience

1 Credit (elective)

This course allows additional time for students to be exposed to careers in an internship areas as related to the AFNR cluster in a specific career.

Introduction to Agriscience

1 Credit (elective)

Introduction to Agriculture courses survey a wide array of topics within the agricultural industry, exposing students to the many and varied types of agriculture and livestock career opportunities and to those in related fields (such as natural resources). These courses serve to introduce students to the agriculture field, providing them an opportunity to identify an area for continued study of to determine that their interest lies elsewhere. They often focus on developing communication skills, business principles, and leadership skills.

Cheri Dohrmann | Jodi Lonker

Business Essentials

.5 credit (elective)

This is a core course designed to give students an overview of the business, marketing and finance career cluster occupations. Students will develop an understanding of how academic skills in mathematics, economics, and written and oral communications are integral components of success in these occupations. Students will examine current events to determine their impact on business and industry and legal and ethical behavior, acquire knowledge of safe and secure goals, and identify employability and personal skills needed to obtain a career and be successful in the workplace. As students learn about different types of business ownership, they will interpret industry laws and regulations to ensure compliance, identify principles of business management, and analyze business practices to determine ethics and social responsibilities.

Accounting

1 credit (elective)/3 college credit hours (optional)

Accounting courses introduce and expand upon the fundamental accounting principles and procedures used in businesses. Course content typically includes the full accounting cycle, payroll, taxes, debts, depreciation, ledger and journal techniques, and periodic adjustments. Students may learn how to apply standards auditing principles and to prepare budgets and final records. Calculators, electronic spreadsheets, or other automated tools are usually used. Advanced topics may include elementary principles of partnership and corporate accounting and the managerial uses of control systems and the accounting process.

Accounting II

1 credit (elective)

Advanced Accounting courses expand upon the fundamental accounting principles and procedures used in businesses. Course content typically includes the full accounting cycle, payroll, taxes, debts, depreciation, ledger and journal techniques, and periodic adjustments. Students learn how to apply standards auditing principles and to prepare budgets and final reports. Calculators, electronic spreadsheets, or other automated tools are usually used. Topics include principles of partnership and corporate accounting and the managerial uses of control systems and the accounting process and further enhancement of accounting skills.

Personal Finance

.5 credit

Consumer Economics/Personal Finance courses provide students with an understanding of the concepts and principles involved in managing one’s personal finances. Topics may include savings and investing, credit, insurance, taxes and social security, spending patterns and budget planning, contracts, and consumer protection. These courses may also provide an overview of the American economy.

Lowell Dohrmann | Michael Stull | Wally Wolgast

Introduction to Industrial Technology

An introductory level course designed to instruct students in the basic skills necessary to all occupations in the Construction, Manufacturing and Transportation areas.

Drafting

Architectural courses introduce students to and help them refine the technical craft of drawing illustrations to represent and/or analyze design specifications, using examples drawn from architectural applications. These courses are intended to help students develop general drafting skills, but place a particular emphasis on interior and exterior residential (and light commercial) design, site orientation, floor plans, electrical plans, design sketches, and presentation drawings. In addition, students may prepare scale models.

CAD

1 Credit (elective)

Drafting-General Courses, usually offered as a sequence of courses, introduce students to the technical craft of drawing illustrations to represent and/or analyze design specifications and then refine the skills necessary for this craft. Drafting-General courses use exercises from a variety of applications to provide students with the knowledge and experience to develop the ability to perform freehand sketching, lettering, geometric construction, and multiview projections and to produce various types of drawings. Computer-aided drafting (CAD) systems are typically introduced and used to fulfill course objectives.

Architecture Design

Research & Design for Pre-Construction

Advanced research and application course that covers specific topics in design & pre-construction (drafting/architecture) to include management and “green design” skills.

Woodworking Principles

Frequently offered as an intermediary step to more advanced drafting courses (or as a concurrent course), CAD Design and Software courses introduce students to the computer-aided drafting systems available in the industry.

Carpentry II

Cabinetmaking courses provide students with experience in constructing cases, cabinets, counters, and other interior woodwork. Students learn to distinguish between various types of furniture construction and their appropriate applications, and how to use various woodworking machines and power tools for cutting and shaping wood. Cabinetmaking courses cover the different methods of joining pieces of wood, how to use mechanical fasteners, and how to attach hardware. Initial topics may resemble those taught in Woodworking courses; more advanced topics may include how to install plastic laminates on surfaces and how to apply spray finishes.

Furniture & Cabinetry Fabrication

An advanced level application course designed to provide students with experience in constructing cases, cabinets, counters, furniture and interior woodwork.

Jake Bjostad

Biology

Required

Biology courses are designed to provide information regarding the fundamental concepts of life and life processes. These courses include (but are not restricted to) such topics as cell structure and function, general plant and animal physiology, genetics, and taxonomy.

Chemistry

Either General Chemistry OR Chemistry is required

Chemistry courses involve studying the composition, properties, and reactions of substances. These courses typically explore such concepts as the behaviors of solids, liquids, and gases; acid/base and oxidation/reduction reactions; and atomic structure. Chemical formulas and equations and nuclear reactions are also studied.

Medical Terminology A

In Medical Terminology courses, students learn how to identify medical terms by analyzing their components. These courses emphasize defining medical prefixes, root words, suffixes, and abbreviations. The primary focus is on developing both oral and written skills in the language used to communicate within health care professions.

Human Anatomy and Physiology

Usually taken after a comprehensive initial study of biology, Anatomy and Physiology courses present the human body and biological systems in more detail. In order to understand the structure of the human body and its functions, students learn anatomical terminology, study cells and tissues, explore functional systems (skeletal, muscular, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, reproductive, nervous, and so on) and may dissect mammals. Students MUST complete a full year of regular Chemistry prior to enrolling in Anatomy.

Certified Nursing Aide

Certified Medical Assistant

A program that prepares students to administer prescribed medications; observe and report patient reactions and side effects; and perform related emergency and recording duties under the supervision of nurses and/or physicians. Includes instruction in basic anatomy and physiology, common medications and their effects, taking vital signs, oxygen administration, medication administration and application, record-keeping, and patient observation.

Michael Stull

Introduction to Agriculture

Introduction to Agriculture courses survey a wide array of topics within the agricultural industry, exposing students to the many and varied types of agriculture and livestock career opportunities and to those in related fields (such as natural resources). These courses serve to introduce students to the agricultural field, providing them an opportunity to identify an area for continued study or to determine that their interest lies elsewhere. They often focus on developing communication skills, business principles, and leadership skills.

Welding

1 Credit (elective)

Agriculture Welding courses provide students with the skills and knowledge that are specifically applicable to the tools and equipment used in the agricultural industry. In learning to apply basic industrial knowledge and skills (engines, power, welding, and carpentry, among others), students may explore a broad range of topics, including the operation, mechanics, and care of farm tools and machines; the construction and repair of structures integral to farm operations; an introduction or review of electricity and power; and safety procedures.

Ag Mechanics

1 Credit (elective)

Agriculture Mechanics/Equipment/Structures courses provide students with the skills and knowledge that are specifically applicable to the tools and equipment used in the agricultural industry. While learning to apply basic industrial knowledge and skills (engine mechanics, power systems, welding, and carpentry, among others), students may explore a broad range of topics, including the operation, mechanics, and care of farm tools and machines; the construction and repair of structures integral to farm operations; a study of electricity and power principles; and safety procedures.

Advanced Welding

1 Credit (elective)

Agriculture Welding courses provide students with the skills and knowledge that are specifically applicable to the tools and equipment used in the agricultural industry. In learning to apply further industrial knowledge and skills (engines, power, welding, and carpentry, among others), students may explore a broad range of topics, including the operation, mechanics, and care of farm tools and machines; the construction and repair of structures integral to farm operations; an introduction or review of electricity and power; and safety procedures.

Agriculture Business

1 Credit (elective) | Even Years Only

Agribusiness Management courses provide students with the information and skills necessary for success in agribusiness and in operating entrepreneurial ventures in the agricultural industry. These courses may cover topics such as economic principles, budgeting, risk management, finance, business law, marketing and promotion strategies, insurance, and resource management. Other possible topics include developing a business plan, employee/employer relations, problem-solving and decision-making, commodities, and building leadership skills. These courses may also incorporate a survey of the careers within the agricultural industry.

Internship in Agriculture

1 Credit (elective)

Provides students to gain knowledge and skills for various Agriculture Careers. Students will provide a detailed log of experiences and hours while participating.

Advanced Introduction to Agriscience

1 Credit (elective)

This course allows additional time for students to be exposed to careers in an internship areas as related to the AFNR cluster in a specific career.

Pratt Community College

Brakes I

A comprehensive, technical level course designed to provide students with the basic theories, equipment, and skills needed to inspect and service braking systems.

Brakes II

A comprehensive, application level course designed to provide students with the basic skills needed to inspect, service and repair braking systems to industry standards.

Steering and Suspension I

A comprehensive, technical level course designed to provide students with the basic theories, equipment, and skills needed to inspect and service steering and suspension systems.

Steering and Suspension II

A comprehensive, application level course designed to provide students with the advanced skills needed to inspect, service and repair steering and suspension systems.

BARBER COUNTY NORTH | USD 254

Central Office - 620.886.3370Junior Senior High School - 620.886.5667Grade School - 620.886.5608